Tag Archives: Ayotzinapa

Sullen outlook as Mexican mid-term elections near

The electorate
The electorate

Here in Mexico City the light poles and overpasses – and just about every other available surface – are festooned with taxpayer-financed electoral propaganda. Yes, there’s a buzz in the air, and it’s the sound of José Lunchpails across the nation saying “How can I possibly vote for any of these unconscionably corrupt political parties and their hopelessly venal candidates?”

To be honest, this will be our challenge when we head to the polls on June 7 to vote for members of the federal Chamber of Deputies, and in some locations for state governors and other local officials. Locally here in Mexico City, we will vote for representatives to the Legislative Assembly of the Federal District (ALDF) and heads of the city boroughs, called Delegaciones. In certain aspects, June 7 will be an election of firsts. Continue reading Sullen outlook as Mexican mid-term elections near

Peña playing weak defense on Guerrero

GuerreroThe appalling level of violence, corruption and impunity in the state of Guerrero was outed last year, and with very little resolved in the case of the 43 students kidnapped and disappeared, protests over the government’s inaction are now out of hand. When the story of the 43 students from Ayotzinapa made headlines around the world, President Enrique Peña Nieto’s tepid-to-none response suggested that either 1) he really didn’t care, or 2) he just didn’t have any idea of how to respond. Now, as gangs of armed civilians absolutely run amok in the state, it is more than clear that the government led by Peña really has no idea what to do, they appear to be helpless, and they also still may not care. That’s how bad this is. Continue reading Peña playing weak defense on Guerrero

Where Mexico is at as 2014 comes to a close

How about it?
How about it?

We are into late December here at the Mexico Business Blog Global Campus, which is either a sprawling, eco-friendly complex in central Mexico City or a fortified underground lair carved deep into the Ajusco mountain, depending on our temperament each day. Virgin of Guadalupe Day has come and gone already, which means most office workers’ minds here in Mexico are now fully focused on the customary end-of-year lunches, dinners and receptions that are taking the place of any kind of work that might otherwise have been performed or at least thought about. We, of course, are maintaining our usual stringent productivity standards but before we head out to the next punchbowl-centric holiday soiree, we thought we would comment briefly on some things that happened in Mexico over the past year. Continue reading Where Mexico is at as 2014 comes to a close